Arizona TreeWorks
Our Service is the Difference

Guidelines

ANSI A300 Standards
 
Using the American National Standard for pruning (ANSI A300), specifications can be written in a number of combinations. The following information is furnished to help you understand more clearly what will be accomplished in a pruning operation.
 
ANSI A300  OBJECTIVES
Hazard Reduction Pruning
Hazard reduction pruning (HRP) is recommended when the primary objective is to reduce the danger to a specific target caused by visibly defined hazards in a tree. For example, HRP may be the primary objective if the community has concerns relative to liability or structural damage.

Maintenance Pruning
Maintenance pruning (MP) is recommended when the primary objective is to maintain or improve tree health and structure, and includes hazard reduction pruning.
 
OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
 
Pruning Objectives
Pruning objectives should be established prior to beginning any pruning operation.

PRUNING TYPES
Hazard reduction pruning and maintenance pruning consist of the selective removal of tree branches, using one or more of the pruning types noted below:
 
Crown cleaning... Crown cleaning shall consist of the selective removal of one or more of the following items: dead, dying or diseased branches, weak branches and water sprouts.
Crown thinning... Crown thinning shall consist of the selective removal of branches to increase light penetration, air movement and reduce weight.
Crown elevation... Crown elevation shall consist of the removal of the lower branches of a tree to provide appropriate clearance.
Crown reduction or crown shaping... Crown reduction decreases the height and/or spread of a tree. Consideration should be given to the ability of a species to sustain this type of pruning.
Vista pruning... Vista pruning is selective thinning of framework limbs or specific areas of the crown to allow a view of an object from a predetermined point. It opens "windows" through trees for a view.
Crown restoration... Crown restoration pruning should improve the structure, form and appearance of trees which have been severely topped, vandalized or storm-damaged.

PRUNING CLASSIFICATIONS
 
Pruning classifications provide further definition as to the extent, relative detail, and pruning technique utilized. These classes may vary in scope based on the particular definitions used and/or regional considerations (climate zones).
 
Class I... Fine pruning is recommended for premium quality work with an emphasis on aesthetic considerations in addition to structural enhancement.
 
Fine pruning consists of the removal of dead, dying, diseased, decayed, interfering, objectionable, obstructing and weak branches, as well as selective thinning to lessen wind resistance. The removal of such described branches is to include those on the main trunks, as well as those inside the leaf areas. An occasional undesirable branch up to ½ inch in diameter may remain with the main leaf area to its full length, when it is not practical to remove.
 
Class II… Standard pruning is recommended, where aesthetic considerations are secondary to structural enhancement and tree health concerns. Often used when pruning cycles are greater than one year
 
Standard pruning consists of the removal of dead, dying, diseased, decaying interfering, objectionable, obstructing and weak branches, as well as selective thinning to lessen wind resistance. The removal of such described branches is to include those on the main trunks as well as those inside the leaf area. An occasional undesirable branch up to one inch may remain, where it is not practical to remove it.
 
Class III…  This pruning is recommended, where safety considerations are paramount. Typically the lowest cost approach and can be effectively used with annual budget cycles, if trees are in relatively good condition. This is not recommended when trees are overgrown or neglected.
 
Class III pruning consists of removal of dead, diseased, decaying, and obviously weak branches, two inches in diameter or greater.
 
Structural Clearance… This type of pruning is recommended when it is desirable to free buildings, parking structures, walkways, and streets of interfering branches.
 
Structural clearance is most often associated with crown elevation and crown reduction. Specifications for clearance are typically three feet for buildings and carports, eight feet for walkways and eighteen feet for traffic right of ways.
Phone: 602.841.2900   |  Fax: 602-841-3773   |  Email: service@aztreeworks.com  Sitemap